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Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) yesterday published the Improved Forest Management on Private Land, Version 1.0 protocol (IFM Protocol) alongside the previously published protocols for Landfill Methane Recovery and Destruction and Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Refrigeration Systems (see our earlier bulletin here). The IFM Protocol provides requirements for project implementation and the methodology for quantifying greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions from eligible IFM projects. Carbon offset credits generated under the Canadian Greenhouse Gas Offset Credit System Regulations (the Regulations) from eligible projects can be used to comply with obligations under the federal Output-Based Pricing System or to meet voluntary climate targets or commitments.  The launch of the IFM Protocol follows British Columbia’s recently published revised Forest Carbon Offset Protocol 2.0 earlier this month, which, among other updates, now requires First Nation engagement and consultation on all projects (see our bulletin on the draft protocol here).  This bulletin briefly summarizes the IFM Protocol and provides updates regarding other protocols under development by ECCC.  The IFM Protocol Eligible projects under the IFM Protocol may register in Canada’s GHG Offset Credit System if the following conditions, among others, are met: Location. The project must be located in private forestland where carrying out forest management activities is legally permissible and is considered merchantable (“managed forestland”) in a province or territory in Canada. However, the IFM Protocol is also applicable to provincial and federal Crown lands where a First Nation has exclusive use and occupation. Baseline scenarios. Baseline scenarios may be updated during the crediting with a minimum of 5 years between updates. To determine the baseline scenario, proponents must follow a 3-step process set out in the IFM Protocol to determine regional and project-specific scenarios and the most conservative baseline scenarios between them. Eligible project activities. Project proponents may undertake any IFM activity that enhances carbon stocks within the project site relative to the baseline scenario. Eligible project activities include,…

Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change (the “Minister”), in collaboration with the Minister of Energy and Natural Resources, has announced the release of proposed Clean Electricity Regulations (the “Proposed Regulations”) (see our earlier bulletin on prior consultations here). The Proposed Regulations would establish significant and ambitious emission performance standards (“EPS”) to reduce greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions from fossil fuel-generated electricity generation facilities in all provinces and territories across Canada starting in 2035. Environment and Climate Change Canada (“ECCC”) estimates that the Proposed Regulations would result in a net reduction of 342 million metric tonnes (Mt) of CO2e emissions between 2024 and 2050 and a net benefit to society of $28.9B. The Proposed Regulations also impose significant registration, record keeping, and reporting obligations on covered electricity generation facilities. The Proposed Regulations represent a significant foray by the federal government into electricity policy, which has traditionally been an area of provincial jurisdiction. In their current form, the Proposed Regulations are expected to attract opposition from some provincial governments, and potential constitutional legal challenges. ECCC is seeking feedback on the Proposed Regulations. Interested stakeholders are encouraged to review the Proposed Regulations and submit detailed comments by no later than November 2, 2023.  We anticipate that policy developments are being targeted for announcement before or at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties meetings (COP28 Paris Agreement negotiations) that start on November 30, 2023, in Dubai, UAE. This bulletin briefly summarizes key details of the Proposed Regulation: Application. The Proposed Regulations would apply to any “unit” (defined as an assembly comprised of any equipment that is physically connected and that operates together to generate electricity, and (a) must include at least a boiler or combustion engine and (b) may include duct burners and other combustion devices, heat recovery systems, steam turbines, generators, emission control devices and carbon capture and storage (“CCS”) systems) that meets the three following criteria:…

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change on Monday announced the release of the Inefficient Fossil Fuel Subsidies Government of Canada Self‑Review Assessment Framework (the Assessment Framework) and the Inefficient Fossil Fuel Subsidies Government of Canada Guidelines (the Guidelines). The Assessment Framework and Guidelines were jointly developed by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the Department of Finance Canada and are intended to support Canada’s 2009 commitment alongside other G20 countries to phase out and rationalize inefficient fossil fuel subsidies over the medium-term while providing targeted support for the poorest. The Assessment Framework also builds on Canada’s commitment under the Statement on International Public Support for the Clean Energy Transition (the Glasgow Statement) in 2021 at COP 26 in Glasgow, to end new direct public support for international unabated fossil fuel, except in limited and clearly defined circumstances that are consistent with the 1.5°C warming limit and the goals of the Paris Agreement. This bulletin briefly summarizes key information and criteria provided in the Assessment Framework and Guidelines. Assessment Framework. ECCC noted that the Assessment Framework is the “first transparently published methodology worldwide” and that it will be used to determine which tax and non-tax measures constitute an “inefficient fossil fuel subsidy”. The Assessment Framework defines “measures” as including: (i) expenditure programs (i.e., grants, contributions, transfers); (ii) intramural research and development; (iii) tariff and duty reliefs; and (iv) tax expenditures that support fossil fuel consumption or that can be claimed by the fossil fuel sector and that represent alternatives to expenditure programs (i.e., tax credits, accelerated capital cost allowances, flow-through shares), and utilizes the World Trade Organization’s definition of “subsidy” as set out in Article 1.1 of the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures. The international carbon markets provisions of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement will have an…

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has published the Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Refrigeration Systems, Version 1.0 protocol (the Refrigeration Protocol). ECCC also published a new version of the Landfill Methane Recovery and Destruction, Version 1.1 protocol which was first published on June 8, 2022. The Refrigeration Protocol supports Canada’s commitments to phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) under the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, wherein developed countries agreed to gradually phase down HFCs starting in 2019 to 15% of calculated baseline levels by 2036. This bulletin briefly summarizes the Refrigeration Protocol and provides important updates on protocol development under Canada’s Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Offset Credit System. The Refrigeration Protocol Eligible projects under the Refrigeration Protocol may register in Canada’s GHG Offset Credit System if the following conditions are met: Location. The project must be located in a province or territory in Canada. Additionality. GHG emission reductions generated by the project must not already be incentivized by carbon pricing and must not occur as a result of federal, provincial or territorial regulations or where a project proponent is required to retrofit or replace a pre-existing refrigeration system or its refrigerant. Baseline conditions. The system used in the baseline scenario must be either a stand-alone medium- or low-temperature refrigeration system, centralized refrigeration system, condensing unit, chiller, commercial air conditioning system or a heat pump. Pre-existing refrigeration systems must be operating for a minimum of three years prior to the project start date. Eligible project activities. The proponent can retrofit a pre-existing refrigeration system to use an eligible refrigerant, install a new refrigeration system containing an eligible refrigerant, and if applicable, destroy HFCs contained in refrigerant taken out of a pre-existing refrigeration system.   Eligible refrigerant. The refrigerant used in the project scenario must have a global warming potential (GWP) lower than values provided…

Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change has announced the publication of the final Clean Fuel Regulations (CFR) to replace the federal Renewable Fuels Regulation (RFR). The final CFR was approved by Cabinet on June 20, which will now also be the date that early crediting commences. The official version of the CFR will be published in Canada Gazette Part II on July 6. The federal government intends for the CFR to reduce Canada’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by up to 26.6 million tCO2e by 2030. An unofficial version of the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement has also been released. This bulletin briefly highlights key details and recent changes to the CFR, which repeal and replace the RFR while retaining the minimum volumetric requirements of at least 5% low CI fuel content in gasoline and 2% low CI fuel content in diesel fuel and light fuel oil. Compliance requirements. The CFR will require gasoline and diesel primary suppliers (producers and importers) to reduce the carbon intensity (CI) of the gasoline and diesel they produce in, and import into, Canada from 2016 CI levels by 3.5 gCO2e/MJ in 2023, increasing at a rate of 1.5 gCO2e/MJ to 14 gCO2e/MJ in 2030 (up from 12 gCO2e/MJ in prior iterations). The annual CI reduction requirements that primary suppliers must meet for the gasoline and diesel fuels they supply to Canada is the difference between a baseline CI value and a CI limit for gasoline and diesel. Compliance requirements under the CFR will come into effect on July 1, 2023, with the first compliance review in December 2023.  Credit market. The CFR will also establish a credit market providing for three main categories of credit-creating action: Actions that reduce the CI of the fossil fuel throughout its lifecycle through GHG reduction projects (e.g., carbon capture and storage); Supplying low-carbon…